The Ballet of Ballettes of Solomon, called in Latin, Canticum Canticorum.
[Song of Solomon]
O that he would kisse me with the kisses of his mouth: for thy loue is more pleasaunt then wine,
and that because of the good and pleasaunt sauour of thy most precious baulmes.
Thy name is a sweet smelling oyntment when it is shed foorth, therfore do the maydens loue thee.
Drawe thou me [vnto thee] we wyll runne after thee.
The kyng hath brought me into his priuie chaumbers: We wylbe glad and reioyce in thee, we thinke more of thy loue then of wine: they that be righteous loue thee.
I am blacke (O ye daughters of Hierusalem) but yet fayre and well fauoured, like as the tentes of the Cedarenes, and as the hanginges of Solomon.
Marueyle not at me that I am so blacke, for why?
the sunne hath shined vpon me: my mothers chyldren haue euyll wyll at me, they made me the keper of the vineyardes, but mine owne vineyarde haue I not kept.
Tell me O thou whom my soule loueth, where thou feedest the sheepe, where thou makest them rest at the noone day: for why shall I be like hym that goeth wrong about the flockes of thy companions?
If thou knowe not thy selfe (O thou fayrest among women) then go thy way foorth after the footesteppes of the sheepe, and feede thy goates besyde the shepheardes tentes.
Unto the hoast of Pharaos charets haue I compared thee, O my loue.
Thy cheekes and thy necke is beautifull as the turtles, and hanged with spanges and goodly iewels,
a neckband of golde wyll we make thee, with siluer buttons.
When the king sitteth at the table, he shall smell my Nardus:
a bundell of myrre is my loue vnto me, he wyll lye betwixt my brestes:
a cluster of Camphire in the vineyardes of Engaddi is my loue vnto me.
Oh howe fayre art thou my loue, Oh howe fayre art thou?
thou hast doues eyes.
O howe fayre art thou my beloued, howe well fauoured art thou?
Our bed is dect with flowres,
the seelinges of our house are of Cedar tree, and our crosse ioyntes of Cipresse.